Sunday, October 07, 2007

Should Rudy get communion?

Here's a story about a Roman Catholic Archbishop saying he would not serve communion to Rudy Giuliani.

His belief: "Burke says that anyone administering Communion — ordained priest or lay minister — is morally obligated to deny it to Catholic politicians who support an abortion-rights position contrary to church teaching."

What do you think? Is this appropriate?

(Thanks to David for the link)

8 comments:

Jim said...

Just my opinion, but why is it we understand if a secular organization has "standards" and rules that govern its existence, yet we fail to give the same freedom to ecclesiastical bodies? A man should be able to live his faith, as he sees it, on either side of the pulpit, as far as I'm concerned. You just have to know that in the Church, like anywhere else in this society, majority dictates...

Brad Wright said...

Interesting idea Jim. I suppose there are two quesions--does the church have the moral right to do this (which it would seem to, as per your argument), and is it the most appropriate response.

It seems harsh, but I don't know that I have a problem with it.

Jay Livingston said...

Hell, I wouldn't serve a cup of lukewarm coffee to Giuliani because of his political beliefs, statements, and actions. Of course, my opinions about who to serve whom shouldn't affect anyone else's views. Neither should the priest's, though they probably do. I also suspect that the priest is making this announcement as a way of affecting Giuliani's political fortunes more than as a matter of theology.

Arun said...

For what other thought crimes would the Catholic Church deny communion?

Knumb said...

Whatever the case (I'm not going to weigh in on the theological aspects of this), it's trite to call this a "thought crime."

He's a politician who has identified himself as a Catholic and advocated a stance on an issue important to the church.

Once again, the mixture of politics and religion is not good for religion.

Brad Wright said...

Very funny Jay about the coffee. As you mention it, I'm not so sure what the purpose of the public announcement is, especially since the church official in question is far away from NYC.

I agree with John, Arun, that thought crime might not capture what's going on here. Catholic belief holds with-in womb life as sacred and so abortion is a pretty big deal for them.

Jerry said...

What's interesting to me here is that Guiliani has such a strong religious background--studying religion in college. He certainly doesn't come across as a conservative evangelical. I'm not a catholic, but it does seem like some bishops really hammer away at the abortion issue, but not at other issues such as capital punishment (or even issues of social justice more broadly). The guy's been divorced two times already, definitely not Catholic, but that doesn't come up. Communion is about dispensation of grace, and I'm not sure any of these merit putting someone's salvation in danger--that's certainly not based in anything Biblical.

S.S.Stone said...

As a practicing Catholic I think he should be allowed Holy Communion. I could write a book on the things that I oppose within the Catholic Church and I do make my views known to my pastor..He's stated that I'm the thorn in his side(not sure if he was joking lol) much like the thorn that St. Peter suffered..I don't think it says anywhere that God removed that thorn either ;)