Friday, March 30, 2007

SociologyMonkey.com

This last week I created an online survey using surveymonkey.com. Wow! Where have you been all my life? (Or, at least career). It was actually easier to do it with SurveyMonkey than it is just using MSWord... I didn't bother reading the instructions (of course), and still got the survey up and running in no time on the first try. Not only that, SurveyMonkey has a great way of keeping track and contacting respondents.

Here's my only concern... why monkey? Last week I also had to use something from mediamonkey, so I did a little googling and found a whole troop of online monkeys.

Some of these added monkey to existing concepts, perhaps just to make them more fun:
Surveymonkey.com
mediamonkey.com
webmonkey.com
brew-monkey.com (Hey, I could have used that as a homepage)
Beer-monkey.com
Peace-monkey.com
Yoga-monkey.com

Some added monkey to apparently random words:
Pinkmonkey.com
Sockmonkey.com
Free-monkey.com
Bubblemonkey.com

The subtle-yet-powerful Japanese warrior-monkey connection:
samurai-monkey.com
Ninja-monkey.com

And finally, this site added monkey to something I would never associate with jungle animals:
Hockeymonkey.com
Goaliemonkey.com

I expect to see the following church-related sites:
Salvationmonkey.com
Givemoneytoourchurchmonkey.com
Evangelismmonkey.com
Popemonkey.com
StPaulsmonkey.com

Basically, "monkey.com" is used to mean accessible, fun website containing specialized information/ services on a given topic.

Why just monkeys? Why not otters or other "fun" animals?

Maybe we can use other animals to signify types of websites. E.g., ____kitten.com could be sites that have cute pictures. ____horse.com could be anything outside. _____dungbettle.com could mean sophmoric humor. ______whale.com could be conservation sites.


Photo

5 comments:

Spazz McMonkey said...

Sock monkeys are not random. They are the epitome of high art (as in, "You'd have to be high to consider one art." But, they are still cool.)

As one monkey enthusiast recently said, "oook ook ook ooooooooooooook!"

This roughly translates to, "Sock monkeys are the next best thing to having a monkey in socks, so please don't call them random anymore. Thank you for your time."

Yes, it turns out that monkey is a condensed language and a lot can be said in a few words even if it doesn't make that much sense in translation.

Brad Wright said...

I will not refer to sock-monkeys as random.
I will not refer to sock-monkeys as random.
I will not refer to sock-monkeys as random.
I will not refer to sock-monkeys as random.
I will not refer to sock-monkeys as random.
I will not refer to sock-monkeys as random.
I will not refer to sock-monkeys as random.

Gary S said...

I think it was Uggen who linked to monk-e-mail several months back from his blog. I still haven't used it in class, but I'm considering it:
http://www.careerbuilder.com/monk-e-mail/

Brad Wright said...

Gary, that is the funniest site! I have already sent several e-mails with it, and am trying to figure out how to do everything with it. Thanks!

Melanie Kissell said...

I was searching Google images and bumped into your blog ...

I really appreciate your Spirit and your Spunk!

Write On,
~Melanie Kissell